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Teachers salary.. Options
kargo93
Posted: December 19, 2010 1:26:13 PM

Rank: Posteur Expérimenté
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/22/2010
Posts: 184
Location: Underwater
hey,
For some time now I wanted to become a Business/ IT teacher...
Like I love teaching my friends about economics, computers, etc... But I'm a bit turned off by their salaries..
It takes like 10 years to finally make 70K

And all the teachers at my school drive like cheap cars, they seem to rent out houses... etc.
It seems like they dont have a good lifestyle...

someone fill me in on their salaries...
I always wanted to work in Vancouver BC, but I live in Toronto, ON
How would I go about teaching there?

also how is job outlook? will I surely have a job?

thank you,

Applied to:
Ryerson - Bcomm | UWindsor - Bcomm Co-op | York- Concurrent


Kargo93- on new forum
TheSituation
Posted: December 19, 2010 2:03:28 PM

Rank: 3M National Teaching Fellow
Groups: Member

Joined: 5/5/2010
Posts: 843
Location: GTL
The cost of living in Vancouver is higher than Toronto. And I'm sure when you say "Toronto, ON" you aren't referring to living right downtown, but most likely in a suburb north, east, or west of the city.

The teachers at my old school drove pretty nice cars...

And you only have to work 9 months effectively. Teachers live the dream.

University of Western Ontario
Business Management and Organizational Studies (BMOS)
Class of 2013

dunno wrote:
The Asian floor was one of the tightest floors in the rez
j-fo
Posted: December 19, 2010 2:05:14 PM

Rank: Posteur Intermédiaire
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/12/2010
Posts: 560
Location: Vancouver
Marry rich. And don't choose the two most expensive cities in Canada.

McGill - Linguistics & Computer science // U of T - Linguistics & Computing // UBC - Computer science & Linguistics
Queen's - Cognitive science // SFU - Computing science & Linguistics
kargo93
Posted: December 19, 2010 2:41:24 PM

Rank: Posteur Expérimenté
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/22/2010
Posts: 184
Location: Underwater
TheSituation wrote:
The cost of living in Vancouver is higher than Toronto. And I'm sure when you say "Toronto, ON" you aren't referring to living right downtown, but most likely in a suburb north, east, or west of the city.

The teachers at my old school drove pretty nice cars...

And you only have to work 9 months effectively. Teachers live the dream.


I actually meant I wanna live in BC near Vancouver in suburb...

Is it possible to become a teacher and live a nice lifestyle..?
support a family, own a house, etc...

Applied to:
Ryerson - Bcomm | UWindsor - Bcomm Co-op | York- Concurrent


Kargo93- on new forum
TheSituation
Posted: December 19, 2010 2:47:54 PM

Rank: 3M National Teaching Fellow
Groups: Member

Joined: 5/5/2010
Posts: 843
Location: GTL
kargo93 wrote:
TheSituation wrote:
The cost of living in Vancouver is higher than Toronto. And I'm sure when you say "Toronto, ON" you aren't referring to living right downtown, but most likely in a suburb north, east, or west of the city.

The teachers at my old school drove pretty nice cars...

And you only have to work 9 months effectively. Teachers live the dream.


I actually meant I wanna live in BC near Vancouver in suburb...

Is it possible to become a teacher and live a nice lifestyle..?
support a family, own a house, etc...


I'm pretty sure the suburbs are super expensive as well. I know my dad got offered a job in Coquitlam, BC (suburb of Vancouver) for a huge amount of money and turned it down because the cost of housing and living is so much more than the GTA (one of the reasons anyway).

Yes, you can be a teacher and have a nice lifestyle. I don't know what the average salary of a teacher is, but I would guess around $70,000? x2 is $140,000. A family with a before-tax income of $140,000 can have a pretty nice lifestyle.

Yes you can own a house and support a family no problem. You must go to some ghetto-ass high school because teachers at mine had houses, families, etc.



University of Western Ontario
Business Management and Organizational Studies (BMOS)
Class of 2013

dunno wrote:
The Asian floor was one of the tightest floors in the rez
j-fo
Posted: December 19, 2010 3:51:44 PM

Rank: Posteur Intermédiaire
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/12/2010
Posts: 560
Location: Vancouver
TheSituation wrote:

I'm pretty sure the suburbs are super expensive as well. I know my dad got offered a job in Coquitlam, BC (suburb of Vancouver) for a huge amount of money and turned it down because the cost of housing and living is so much more than the GTA (one of the reasons anyway).


Yeah, they are. I live in a Vancouver suburb and houses are way overpriced.

McGill - Linguistics & Computer science // U of T - Linguistics & Computing // UBC - Computer science & Linguistics
Queen's - Cognitive science // SFU - Computing science & Linguistics
kargo93
Posted: December 19, 2010 4:43:45 PM

Rank: Posteur Expérimenté
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/22/2010
Posts: 184
Location: Underwater
TheSituation wrote:
kargo93 wrote:
TheSituation wrote:
The cost of living in Vancouver is higher than Toronto. And I'm sure when you say "Toronto, ON" you aren't referring to living right downtown, but most likely in a suburb north, east, or west of the city.

The teachers at my old school drove pretty nice cars...

And you only have to work 9 months effectively. Teachers live the dream.


I actually meant I wanna live in BC near Vancouver in suburb...

Is it possible to become a teacher and live a nice lifestyle..?
support a family, own a house, etc...


I'm pretty sure the suburbs are super expensive as well. I know my dad got offered a job in Coquitlam, BC (suburb of Vancouver) for a huge amount of money and turned it down because the cost of housing and living is so much more than the GTA (one of the reasons anyway).

Yes, you can be a teacher and have a nice lifestyle. I don't know what the average salary of a teacher is, but I would guess around $70,000? x2 is $140,000. A family with a before-tax income of $140,000 can have a pretty nice lifestyle.

Yes you can own a house and support a family no problem. You must go to some ghetto-ass high school because teachers at mine had houses, families, etc.



Thanks, and no Teacher drive middle class cars.. but I get the impression They live on rent... etc



Applied to:
Ryerson - Bcomm | UWindsor - Bcomm Co-op | York- Concurrent


Kargo93- on new forum
LawStudent
Posted: December 19, 2010 4:53:07 PM

Rank: Posteur Intermédiaire
Groups: Member

Joined: 7/18/2010
Posts: 683
Location: Ottawa, ON.
What do you mean "only" $70,000 after 10 years? They also have incredible benefits, great working hours (about 8am to 3pm and they can do some marking at home whenever they want), and that $70,000 a year is for only 10 months a year of work (and the 10 months they are working they are not doing full time). Sounds like a good deal to me.

Carleton University
Bachelor of Arts in Law 2011
Nyx
Posted: December 19, 2010 5:05:04 PM

Rank: Membre du conseil étudiant
Groups: Member

Joined: 7/10/2010
Posts: 317
Location: the shwa
What's the starting salary? or whatever that's called

Applying to:

Queens University: Life Science (BSc)
University of Western Ontario: Biomed+ Scholar's electives (maybe) + AEO (BMSc +HBA)
University of Toronto, St George campus: Life Science (BSc), Trinity College or Victoria College
Mcgill University: Biol, Biomed, Life sci (Bsc)
UOIT: Life sci and management (no, please don't comment)
Harvard College
Yale University
Stanford University
Princeton University
Duke University
kargo93
Posted: December 19, 2010 5:05:15 PM

Rank: Posteur Expérimenté
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/22/2010
Posts: 184
Location: Underwater
LawStudent wrote:
What do you mean "only" $70,000 after 10 years? They also have incredible benefits, great working hours (about 8am to 3pm and they can do some marking at home whenever they want), and that $70,000 a year is for only 10 months a year of work (and the 10 months they are working they are not doing full time). Sounds like a good deal to me.


+ BS from kids

I'm wondering why they work in summers.. In other forums I read they dont make enough so they work in summers etc..
However, they do more than 8-3 they mark and prepare for the next day so i'd say 7-6/7
so its basically 60hours a week?

Applied to:
Ryerson - Bcomm | UWindsor - Bcomm Co-op | York- Concurrent


Kargo93- on new forum
LawStudent
Posted: December 19, 2010 5:29:09 PM

Rank: Posteur Intermédiaire
Groups: Member

Joined: 7/18/2010
Posts: 683
Location: Ottawa, ON.
kargo93 wrote:
LawStudent wrote:
What do you mean "only" $70,000 after 10 years? They also have incredible benefits, great working hours (about 8am to 3pm and they can do some marking at home whenever they want), and that $70,000 a year is for only 10 months a year of work (and the 10 months they are working they are not doing full time). Sounds like a good deal to me.


+ BS from kids

I'm wondering why they work in summers.. In other forums I read they dont make enough so they work in summers etc..
However, they do more than 8-3 they mark and prepare for the next day so i'd say 7-6/7
so its basically 60hours a week?


What! BS! Teachers don't work 60 hours a week. They "teach" for about 6 hours a day (say 8:30 to 2:30) and about an hour of that time is a spare to mark and prepare. Preparation for courses takes little to no time: you just need to review your notes and then you're good to go.

Carleton University
Bachelor of Arts in Law 2011
g93
Posted: December 19, 2010 5:44:11 PM

Rank: Membre du conseil étudiant
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/29/2010
Posts: 315
It is quite hard to get a job. You're very lucky to get in when a teachers on maternity leave (called extended leave I believe) and if not you might do some sub.

You need to put a lot of effort in if you get a job for a bit so that the principal will hire you full time. Eg helping out with clubs and sports teams, attending parent teacher council meetings, summer school, anything you can do.

If the principal likes you, he may hire you, or he'll give you a good reference.

And LawStudent, it's the same as anything else: if you put the time and effort in, you will get places faster. Sure you can work the min, but you may never get a good job. Some teachers get close to 50 with marking and after school stuff, plus summer school. And those are the teachers that'll end up getting paid well (and when they get older will be well respected, get to work a little less and still be paid well).

Applied to: Laurier BBA Waterloo AFM-PA Brock BAcc (Co-op)

Might switch Brock BAcc to Guelph BComm- PM me if you are in the program or know someone who is in it or have any info at all.
LawStudent
Posted: December 19, 2010 6:39:36 PM

Rank: Posteur Intermédiaire
Groups: Member

Joined: 7/18/2010
Posts: 683
Location: Ottawa, ON.
g93 wrote:
It is quite hard to get a job. You're very lucky to get in when a teachers on maternity leave (called extended leave I believe) and if not you might do some sub.

You need to put a lot of effort in if you get a job for a bit so that the principal will hire you full time. Eg helping out with clubs and sports teams, attending parent teacher council meetings, summer school, anything you can do.

If the principal likes you, he may hire you, or he'll give you a good reference.

And LawStudent, it's the same as anything else: if you put the time and effort in, you will get places faster. Sure you can work the min, but you may never get a good job. Some teachers get close to 50 with marking and after school stuff, plus summer school. And those are the teachers that'll end up getting paid well (and when they get older will be well respected, get to work a little less and still be paid well).


You don't really need to "get places" in a school though. If you're a teacher, you're a teacher. It's not like you could get promoted to super teacher for working 60 hours a week. In fact, the only promotion I can really think of in a school setting is Department Head.

Carleton University
Bachelor of Arts in Law 2011
g93
Posted: December 19, 2010 7:12:01 PM

Rank: Membre du conseil étudiant
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/29/2010
Posts: 315
^ A job? (getting somewhere) It is very hard to get a Full time job for a teacher. Some get in when a teachers on extended leave and whatnot, but it's very tough to get in early.
And getting somewhere can also refer to increases in pay, and as you stated Department Head and after that possibly administrative positions.

Applied to: Laurier BBA Waterloo AFM-PA Brock BAcc (Co-op)

Might switch Brock BAcc to Guelph BComm- PM me if you are in the program or know someone who is in it or have any info at all.
kaloolah
Posted: December 19, 2010 7:13:55 PM

Rank: Posteur Expérimenté
Groups: Member

Joined: 12/12/2010
Posts: 122
LawStudent wrote:
kargo93 wrote:
LawStudent wrote:
What do you mean "only" $70,000 after 10 years? They also have incredible benefits, great working hours (about 8am to 3pm and they can do some marking at home whenever they want), and that $70,000 a year is for only 10 months a year of work (and the 10 months they are working they are not doing full time). Sounds like a good deal to me.


+ BS from kids

I'm wondering why they work in summers.. In other forums I read they dont make enough so they work in summers etc..
However, they do more than 8-3 they mark and prepare for the next day so i'd say 7-6/7
so its basically 60hours a week?


What! BS! Teachers don't work 60 hours a week. They "teach" for about 6 hours a day (say 8:30 to 2:30) and about an hour of that time is a spare to mark and prepare. Preparation for courses takes little to no time: you just need to review your notes and then you're good to go.


Yeah, right. I'm from a family of teachers. My mom (a band teacher) gets to school at 7:15 and starts teaching at 7:45. She has rehearsals every day at lunch. She gives extra help every day after school and then gets home at about 4:30. She puts in a minimum of two hours in every night of work. She also goes in for at least a week in the summer to prepare, which still leaves a lot of time off though. On weekends she puts in about 2 hours a day.

That would add up to around 60, and she's a music teacher.

I have other teachers in my family (elementary, jr high and high school). I can tell you that they put in an incredible amount of work. 55-60 hours a week would be my guess.

EC's:
Auditioned for the National Youth Band for 2011 (haven't heard back yet, fingers crossed!)
4 years provincial honor band
4 years provincial honor jazz band program
5 years in the honors district music program: choir, band (first chair flute/ piccolo), big band (playing lead sax)
6 years school music program, playing/ singing in various groups such as the choir, concert band, jazz band, jazz combo, sax ensemble, flute ensemble
1 year school debate team
1 year school newspaper
11 years girl guides
Grade 8 RCM flute (working on grade 9)
g93
Posted: December 19, 2010 7:21:12 PM

Rank: Membre du conseil étudiant
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/29/2010
Posts: 315
^ Now call him an incompetent moron or something smile

Applied to: Laurier BBA Waterloo AFM-PA Brock BAcc (Co-op)

Might switch Brock BAcc to Guelph BComm- PM me if you are in the program or know someone who is in it or have any info at all.
TheSituation
Posted: December 19, 2010 9:11:13 PM

Rank: 3M National Teaching Fellow
Groups: Member

Joined: 5/5/2010
Posts: 843
Location: GTL
kaloolah wrote:
LawStudent wrote:
kargo93 wrote:
LawStudent wrote:
What do you mean "only" $70,000 after 10 years? They also have incredible benefits, great working hours (about 8am to 3pm and they can do some marking at home whenever they want), and that $70,000 a year is for only 10 months a year of work (and the 10 months they are working they are not doing full time). Sounds like a good deal to me.


+ BS from kids

I'm wondering why they work in summers.. In other forums I read they dont make enough so they work in summers etc..
However, they do more than 8-3 they mark and prepare for the next day so i'd say 7-6/7
so its basically 60hours a week?


What! BS! Teachers don't work 60 hours a week. They "teach" for about 6 hours a day (say 8:30 to 2:30) and about an hour of that time is a spare to mark and prepare. Preparation for courses takes little to no time: you just need to review your notes and then you're good to go.


Yeah, right. I'm from a family of teachers. My mom (a band teacher) gets to school at 7:15 and starts teaching at 7:45. She has rehearsals every day at lunch. She gives extra help every day after school and then gets home at about 4:30. She puts in a minimum of two hours in every night of work. She also goes in for at least a week in the summer to prepare, which still leaves a lot of time off though. On weekends she puts in about 2 hours a day.

That would add up to around 60, and she's a music teacher.

I have other teachers in my family (elementary, jr high and high school). I can tell you that they put in an incredible amount of work. 55-60 hours a week would be my guess.


She comes in pretty early, but being home at 4:30 is awesome. Teachers don't work 60 hours though LOL. Everyone knows they have the sweet life. You can try to justify it all you want, but they don't work that hard.

LOL - "B/S from kids". Good teachers will engage themselves with the class and have the class respect them. Teachers need to be funny and confident or the kids are gonna walk all over you.

I'm not saying my dad works EXTREMELY hard, and he is not a teacher, but he works about 50-60 hours.
Gets to work at 7:15 or so in the morning, doesn't take a break, doesn't eat lunch usually, comes home around 6:00pm. Has 3 hour night meetings back at the office or wherever 2 nights a week. On the weekend he is usually doing work and reports on the home computer. And yeah, he is on his BlackBerry all the time, gets an email every 5 minutes. Vacation, whenever, he is accountable. Teachers, no.

But it's different, he is a Director, he can do whatever the f- he wants, basically. But ask him about the "hard life" teachers have, he will just laugh at you.
Teachers don't have stress, they get 3 months off effectively. It's a great job, awesome benefits, etc. But don't try and tell me High School teachers work for 60 hours a week, they live the dream.

University of Western Ontario
Business Management and Organizational Studies (BMOS)
Class of 2013

dunno wrote:
The Asian floor was one of the tightest floors in the rez
kaloolah
Posted: December 19, 2010 9:22:55 PM

Rank: Posteur Expérimenté
Groups: Member

Joined: 12/12/2010
Posts: 122
She gets home at 4:30, but then starts doing work at home for another 2 hours. She doesn't take a lunch break. Working from 7:00-6:30 is long.
I'm not saying that they work harder than people in other jobs (with the 2-3 months off and all razz). I was just trying to correct LawStudent, who thinks that they work from 8:30-2:30 (6 hours a day).

I have a lot of really stressed out teachers, so I wouldn't say that they don't have stress.

EC's:
Auditioned for the National Youth Band for 2011 (haven't heard back yet, fingers crossed!)
4 years provincial honor band
4 years provincial honor jazz band program
5 years in the honors district music program: choir, band (first chair flute/ piccolo), big band (playing lead sax)
6 years school music program, playing/ singing in various groups such as the choir, concert band, jazz band, jazz combo, sax ensemble, flute ensemble
1 year school debate team
1 year school newspaper
11 years girl guides
Grade 8 RCM flute (working on grade 9)
TheSituation
Posted: December 19, 2010 9:35:23 PM

Rank: 3M National Teaching Fellow
Groups: Member

Joined: 5/5/2010
Posts: 843
Location: GTL
kaloolah wrote:
She gets home at 4:30, but then starts doing work at home for another 2 hours. She doesn't take a lunch break. Working from 7:00-6:30 is long.
I'm not saying that they work harder than people in other jobs (with the 2-3 months off and all razz). I was just trying to correct LawStudent, who thinks that they work from 8:30-2:30 (6 hours a day).

I have a lot of really stressed out teachers, so I wouldn't say that they don't have stress.


Stress from............

Who is there boss? I'd say their biggest worry is the parents of under-performing students. Not nearly as stressful as a boss who may be the public (aka citizens), senior management, or shareholders. If marking a few tests on your personal time on the weekend gets you stressed, you don't know what real stress is. But again, "real" stress is what earns you big dollars. People are paid more based on the responsibility and accountability the job encompasses. And teaching, at the high school level, does not reflect those two factors predominantly, which is why they make average money.

University of Western Ontario
Business Management and Organizational Studies (BMOS)
Class of 2013

dunno wrote:
The Asian floor was one of the tightest floors in the rez
kargo93
Posted: December 19, 2010 9:55:27 PM

Rank: Posteur Expérimenté
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/22/2010
Posts: 184
Location: Underwater
This is old but here http://www.nucleuslearning.com/content/teacher-pay-scale-across-canada

Applied to:
Ryerson - Bcomm | UWindsor - Bcomm Co-op | York- Concurrent


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