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Why do I need a university course to APPLY to university?? Options
malaz
Posted: July 5, 2010 10:17:32 PM
Rank: Frosh
Groups: Member

Joined: 6/1/2010
Posts: 42
Okay, I am gr. 11 student going into gr. 12 . . . people have been telling me that I NEED calculus in order to be accepted into u of t life sciences. My school offers Calculus (math 1500) which in actuality is A UNIVERSITY COURSE, not an AP or Highschool Course . . . I don't understand why I have to take that in order to qualify for admission to u of t. In grade 12 I will be talking Pre-Cal. Is that good enough to qualify? On the u of t site, it says applicants from Manitoba require 5 TOP courses, and they list Calculus, Pre-Cal, Physics, Bio, Chem and English/French - so can I just apply with Pre-Cal instead of Calculus (because I have no way to take it either way).

Also, in first year university--you don't start your "major" of interest right away, right? Like, in first-year you take prerequisites for that major . . . is that correct, or not. I would love for that to be cleared up because I am really confused about it.

Also, does the university of toronto offer an "intro to calculus" course, if so, couldn't I just take that in first year and then move on to more intermediate Calculus because I am interested in a life sciences program.

Pre-Calculus 12 covers:
Circular Functions
Transformations
Trigonometric Identities
Exponents and Logarithms
Permutations, Combinations, Binomial Theorem
Conics
Probability
Geometric Sequences
Statistics

Is this what HS kids in Ontario learning in gr. 12 math? (I understand you guys have math courses called Advanced Functions, Data and Calculus and Vectors"
HopefulUniGirl
Posted: July 5, 2010 10:22:58 PM

Rank: Président du conseil étudiant
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/8/2009
Posts: 2,334
Location: On This Forum
malaz wrote:
Okay, I am gr. 11 student going into gr. 12 . . . people have been telling me that I NEED calculus in order to be accepted into u of t life sciences. My school offers Calculus (math 1500) which in actuality is A UNIVERSITY COURSE, not an AP or Highschool Course . . . I don't understand why I have to take that in order to qualify for admission to u of t. In grade 12 I will be talking Pre-Cal. Is that good enough to qualify? On the u of t site, it says applicants from Manitoba require 5 TOP courses, and they list Calculus, Pre-Cal, Physics, Bio, Chem and English/French - so can I just apply with Pre-Cal instead of Calculus (because I have no way to take it either way).

Also, in first year university--you don't start your "major" of interest right away, right? Like, in first-year you take prerequisites for that major . . . is that correct, or not. I would love for that to be cleared up because I am really confused about it.

Also, does the university of toronto offer an "intro to calculus" course, if so, couldn't I just take that in first year and then move on to more intermediate Calculus because I am interested in a life sciences program.

Pre-Calculus 12 covers:
Circular Functions
Transformations
Trigonometric Identities
Exponents and Logarithms
Permutations, Combinations, Binomial Theorem
Conics
Probability
Geometric Sequences
Statistics

Is this what HS kids in Ontario learning in gr. 12?


Well about majors. Some universities make you declare your major right away. But unis like Toronto and Mac dont. First year just take the right prereq for you major which could be sometimes be declared before second year.

McMaster- Electrical and Biomedical Engineering Class of 2015


..has sadly made the transition over to MacInsiders
dofer49
Posted: July 5, 2010 10:24:45 PM

Rank: Membre du conseil étudiant
Groups: Member

Joined: 10/31/2009
Posts: 319
Location: Ontario
malaz wrote:
Okay, I am gr. 11 student going into gr. 12 . . . people have been telling me that I NEED calculus in order to be accepted into u of t life sciences. My school offers Calculus (math 1500) which in actuality is A UNIVERSITY COURSE, not an AP or Highschool Course . . . I don't understand why I have to take that in order to qualify for admission to u of t. In grade 12 I will be talking Pre-Cal. Is that good enough to qualify? On the u of t site, it says applicants from Manitoba require 5 TOP courses, and they list Calculus, Pre-Cal, Physics, Bio, Chem and English/French - so can I just apply with Pre-Cal instead of Calculus (because I have no way to take it either way).

Also, in first year university--you don't start your "major" of interest right away, right? Like, in first-year you take prerequisites for that major . . . is that correct, or not. I would love for that to be cleared up because I am really confused about it.

Also, does the university of toronto offer an "intro to calculus" course, if so, couldn't I just take that in first year and then move on to more intermediate Calculus because I am interested in a life sciences program.

Pre-Calculus 12 covers:
Circular Functions
Transformations
Trigonometric Identities
Exponents and Logarithms
Permutations, Combinations, Binomial Theorem
Conics
Probability
Geometric Sequences
Statistics

Is this what HS kids in Ontario learning in gr. 12 math? (I understand you guys have math courses called Advanced Functions, Data and Calculus and Vectors"


1. Not sure about the Manitoba system

2. With U of T, you'll declare your program after the first year. Not sure about other universities.

3. What/s rong with taking university courses? What's wrong with getting a good start? I suggest you take the university course and then go to more of the uni level courses once you reach it.

University of Lethbridge: Digital Audio Arts 2014
malaz
Posted: July 5, 2010 10:51:30 PM
Rank: Frosh
Groups: Member

Joined: 6/1/2010
Posts: 42
dofer49 wrote:

3. What/s rong with taking university courses? What's wrong with getting a good start? I suggest you take the university course and then go to more of the uni level courses once you reach it.

There's nothing wrong with that--in fact i'll be talking AP Biology to get a head start. I don't mind taking Calculus, I wish I could, but I can't. It's too long a story but in short there's a huge schedule conflict since my school offers it only first semester.

Thank you and HopefulUniGirl for the help--that's what I thought regarding majors.
hisse
Posted: July 5, 2010 10:54:36 PM

Rank: Posteur Expérimenté
Groups: Member

Joined: 10/12/2009
Posts: 230
You would have to contact uoft to be sure however most universities require calculus no matter which province you are from, they do make some exceptions like for example if your school does not offer a calculus course, so in this case since they do offer one you would most likely be required to take calculus in some manner in order to qualify for the program. If scheduling at your school makes this difficult then you would most likely be expected to adjust your schedule accordingly, take it online somewhere, night school at a different school or contact them and ask if they would make an exception with your admission. That being said your pre-calc sounds like a combination of advanced functions and data management, calculus and vectors is a whole different monster(not a bad monster, it's fun, but a monster).

Applied - Accepted - Registered
Guelph - Nanoscience, Guelph - Arts and Science, Carleton - Nanoscience, Ottawa - Chemistry co-op, Brock - Chemistry co-op
Roberto
Posted: July 5, 2010 11:22:45 PM

Rank: Membre du conseil étudiant
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Joined: 11/7/2009
Posts: 451
Location: Ontario
malaz wrote:
Okay, I am gr. 11 student going into gr. 12 . . . people have been telling me that I NEED calculus in order to be accepted into u of t life sciences. My school offers Calculus (math 1500) which in actuality is A UNIVERSITY COURSE, not an AP or Highschool Course . . . I don't understand why I have to take that in order to qualify for admission to u of t. In grade 12 I will be talking Pre-Cal. Is that good enough to qualify? On the u of t site, it says applicants from Manitoba require 5 TOP courses, and they list Calculus, Pre-Cal, Physics, Bio, Chem and English/French - so can I just apply with Pre-Cal instead of Calculus (because I have no way to take it either way).

Also, in first year university--you don't start your "major" of interest right away, right? Like, in first-year you take prerequisites for that major . . . is that correct, or not. I would love for that to be cleared up because I am really confused about it.

Also, does the university of toronto offer an "intro to calculus" course, if so, couldn't I just take that in first year and then move on to more intermediate Calculus because I am interested in a life sciences program.

Pre-Calculus 12 covers:
Circular Functions
Transformations
Trigonometric Identities
Exponents and Logarithms
Permutations, Combinations, Binomial Theorem
Conics
Probability
Geometric Sequences
Statistics

Is this what HS kids in Ontario learning in gr. 12 math? (I understand you guys have math courses called Advanced Functions, Data and Calculus and Vectors"

your pre-calculus class sounds like it covers things from data and advanced functions (however it doesn't sound like it covers all of what both classes cover, and geometric sequences are covered in grade 11 here in ontario)

Applied to: Windsor Electrical Engineering, U of T Engineering Track One, and McMaster Engineering Physics
Attending: U of T Track One
lhunthonwen
Posted: July 6, 2010 12:29:20 AM
Rank: Membre du conseil étudiant
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/9/2008
Posts: 480
Location: Mississauga, Ontario
You might want to look at what UFT considers as the course equivalents. We can tell you the breakdown of the Ontario curriculum, but UFT has the final say and you should ask them.

http://www.adm.utoronto.ca/adm-awards/html/admissions/adm_pdf_files/uab_chs_equiv.pdf
The link is from UFT; I don't know if it can be generalised to all of the other universities.

University of Western Ontario '13 - Biomedical Sciences
How Purple Are YOU?

Med-Syd 09/10 ~ London Hall 10/11
A song to listen to~
Toronto12
Posted: July 6, 2010 9:10:50 AM
Rank: Frosh
Groups: Member

Joined: 5/14/2010
Posts: 22
malaz wrote:
Okay, I am gr. 11 student going into gr. 12 . . . people have been telling me that I NEED calculus in order to be accepted into u of t life sciences. My school offers Calculus (math 1500) which in actuality is A UNIVERSITY COURSE, not an AP or Highschool Course . . . I don't understand why I have to take that in order to qualify for admission to u of t. In grade 12 I will be talking Pre-Cal. Is that good enough to qualify? On the u of t site, it says applicants from Manitoba require 5 TOP courses, and they list Calculus, Pre-Cal, Physics, Bio, Chem and English/French - so can I just apply with Pre-Cal instead of Calculus (because I have no way to take it either way).

Also, in first year university--you don't start your "major" of interest right away, right? Like, in first-year you take prerequisites for that major . . . is that correct, or not. I would love for that to be cleared up because I am really confused about it.

Also, does the university of toronto offer an "intro to calculus" course, if so, couldn't I just take that in first year and then move on to more intermediate Calculus because I am interested in a life sciences program.

Pre-Calculus 12 covers:
Circular Functions
Transformations
Trigonometric Identities
Exponents and Logarithms
Permutations, Combinations, Binomial Theorem
Conics
Probability
Geometric Sequences
Statistics

Is this what HS kids in Ontario learning in gr. 12 math? (I understand you guys have math courses called Advanced Functions, Data and Calculus and Vectors"


In my opinion, I think Pre-Calculus is a course that combines advanced functions/Data...So take the Calculus course for better preparation because Calculus and Vectors cover some important things that will help you in university cal (integrals, more derivatives etc)
DeadLine
Posted: July 6, 2010 10:33:43 AM

Rank: Vice-président du conseil étudiant
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Joined: 2/20/2010
Posts: 921
Location: T-Dot
Your HS university course is actually not a real university course. It's called a university course because it's a prereq to real university courses. Essentially, the HS university-level course is a course you need to prepare you for next year's course(s) (at least it is what admissions look for, anyway).

If you can't enroll in yours, then what I would do is to first ask the admissions ppl whether they can give you an exception (explain your situation) when you apply next year. If they turn you down, then find other ways to get that credit (private school, online, etc).

Good luck!

UTSG LIFE SCIENCE 2014 colors
I will quit at the turn of the millenium.
lemun
Posted: July 6, 2010 1:49:26 PM
Rank: Membre du conseil étudiant
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/31/2010
Posts: 471
Actually it is not needed, it is recommended . In reality you could just write the AP Exam and not take the course (like I did) and they still wouldn't care. Although i chose UBC instead when I found out they aren't going to let people skip their 1st-year calculus
malaz
Posted: July 6, 2010 2:56:47 PM
Rank: Frosh
Groups: Member

Joined: 6/1/2010
Posts: 42
DeadLine wrote:
Your HS university course is actually not a real university course. It's called a university course because it's a prereq to real university courses. Essentially, the HS university-level course is a course you need to prepare you for next year's course(s) (at least it is what admissions look for, anyway).

If you can't enroll in yours, then what I would do is to first ask the admissions ppl whether they can give you an exception (explain your situation) when you apply next year. If they turn you down, then find other ways to get that credit (private school, online, etc).

Good luck!

It is actually a university course administered by the University of Manitoba--it is called MAT1500 and we are required to write the midterm and final ... and if you succeed you get 3 credit hours (whatever those are) ... since I am interested in U of T--I am just going for the high school credit. Which is completely fine by me.

Thank you ALL guys for the helpful comments--I figured out that I could possibly concurrently take Pre-calculus 40s and the Intro to Calculus/advanced math course ... this summer I will prepare for pre-cal--a family friend is a math teacher, and she is extremely smart (since she studied math in university) so she's going to help me and that would help me tackle both Pre-cal and Calculus at the same time come September.

And I definitely, IF I get accepted into u of t, don't want to go into physics and chemistry class and be like "I don't understand this" if I only had a pre-cal background. So I want to prepare as much as possible.

lemun wrote:
Actually it is not needed, it is recommended . In reality you could just write the AP Exam and not take the course (like I did) and they still wouldn't care. Although i chose UBC instead when I found out they aren't going to let people skip their 1st-year calculus

There is no AP Exam, there is a midterm and a final that we have to write since it is a first year university intro to calculus course, I take these tests at the University.

Also for the people that said that my Pre-Cal course doesn't cover all the stuff that the Ontario curriculum covers, what's missing? I am extremely curious.
Toronto12
Posted: July 6, 2010 4:29:51 PM
Rank: Frosh
Groups: Member

Joined: 5/14/2010
Posts: 22
malaz wrote:
DeadLine wrote:
Your HS university course is actually not a real university course. It's called a university course because it's a prereq to real university courses. Essentially, the HS university-level course is a course you need to prepare you for next year's course(s) (at least it is what admissions look for, anyway).

If you can't enroll in yours, then what I would do is to first ask the admissions ppl whether they can give you an exception (explain your situation) when you apply next year. If they turn you down, then find other ways to get that credit (private school, online, etc).

Good luck!

It is actually a university course administered by the University of Manitoba--it is called MAT1500 and we are required to write the midterm and final ... and if you succeed you get 3 credit hours (whatever those are) ... since I am interested in U of T--I am just going for the high school credit. Which is completely fine by me.

Thank you ALL guys for the helpful comments--I figured out that I could possibly concurrently take Pre-calculus 40s and the Intro to Calculus/advanced math course ... this summer I will prepare for pre-cal--a family friend is a math teacher, and she is extremely smart (since she studied math in university) so she's going to help me and that would help me tackle both Pre-cal and Calculus at the same time come September.

And I definitely, IF I get accepted into u of t, don't want to go into physics and chemistry class and be like "I don't understand this" if I only had a pre-cal background. So I want to prepare as much as possible.

lemun wrote:
Actually it is not needed, it is recommended . In reality you could just write the AP Exam and not take the course (like I did) and they still wouldn't care. Although i chose UBC instead when I found out they aren't going to let people skip their 1st-year calculus

There is no AP Exam, there is a midterm and a final that we have to write since it is a first year university intro to calculus course, I take these tests at the University.

Also for the people that said that my Pre-Cal course doesn't cover all the stuff that the Ontario curriculum covers, what's missing? I am extremely curious.

Responding to your last question, the Pre-Cal course isn't the same as the cal in Ontario...I may be wrong...
But as I recall, these were in my cal book;
(I don't remember the exact name of each chapter but it had these)
-Limits (Discontinuity, differentiable, slopes of tangents and secants)
-Graphing functions with local max/min/discontinuity/ asymptotes etc
-Optimization
-Derivatives (Power rules, Quotient rules, implicit etc)
-Log, ln, exponent derivatives
-Vectors additions, subtraction
-Some vector optimization (Max speeds etc)
-Vectors with work, torque, force etc
-Cross and dot product
-Integrals (Depending on schools)
-I think Im missing some...

Anyways, if Pre-Cal does not cover these, then you should take the university course during the summer or something. Also, I had the same goal as you during my final year. I applied and got admitted to UTSG life science. For sure, they will look at your Calculus and English mark intensively, so focus on those and your science courses. Anything with 85% should get you in the life science program at UofT. As for other life science programs in other universities, you'll be fine with an 80% (cept Queens, Mcgills, Mac health sci). Well, best of luck to you!!





DeadLine
Posted: July 6, 2010 8:18:35 PM

Rank: Vice-président du conseil étudiant
Groups: Member

Joined: 2/20/2010
Posts: 921
Location: T-Dot
malaz wrote:
DeadLine wrote:
Your HS university course is actually not a real university course. It's called a university course because it's a prereq to real university courses. Essentially, the HS university-level course is a course you need to prepare you for next year's course(s) (at least it is what admissions look for, anyway).

If you can't enroll in yours, then what I would do is to first ask the admissions ppl whether they can give you an exception (explain your situation) when you apply next year. If they turn you down, then find other ways to get that credit (private school, online, etc).

Good luck!

It is actually a university course administered by the University of Manitoba--it is called MAT1500 and we are required to write the midterm and final ... and if you succeed you get 3 credit hours (whatever those are) ... since I am interested in U of T--I am just going for the high school credit. Which is completely fine by me.


oooooooooh i see. sry, i thought (for some reason) that you lived in ontario ><

UTSG LIFE SCIENCE 2014 colors
I will quit at the turn of the millenium.
Nyx
Posted: July 11, 2010 4:15:13 PM

Rank: Membre du conseil étudiant
Groups: Member

Joined: 7/10/2010
Posts: 317
Location: the shwa
malaz wrote:
DeadLine wrote:
Your HS university course is actually not a real university course. It's called a university course because it's a prereq to real university courses. Essentially, the HS university-level course is a course you need to prepare you for next year's course(s) (at least it is what admissions look for, anyway).

If you can't enroll in yours, then what I would do is to first ask the admissions ppl whether they can give you an exception (explain your situation) when you apply next year. If they turn you down, then find other ways to get that credit (private school, online, etc).

Good luck!

It is actually a university course administered by the University of Manitoba--it is called MAT1500 and we are required to write the midterm and final ... and if you succeed you get 3 credit hours (whatever those are) ... since I am interested in U of T--I am just going for the high school credit. Which is completely fine by me.

Thank you ALL guys for the helpful comments--I figured out that I could possibly concurrently take Pre-calculus 40s and the Intro to Calculus/advanced math course ... this summer I will prepare for pre-cal--a family friend is a math teacher, and she is extremely smart (since she studied math in university) so she's going to help me and that would help me tackle both Pre-cal and Calculus at the same time come September.

And I definitely, IF I get accepted into u of t, don't want to go into physics and chemistry class and be like "I don't understand this" if I only had a pre-cal background. So I want to prepare as much as possible.

lemun wrote:
Actually it is not needed, it is recommended . In reality you could just write the AP Exam and not take the course (like I did) and they still wouldn't care. Although i chose UBC instead when I found out they aren't going to let people skip their 1st-year calculus

There is no AP Exam, there is a midterm and a final that we have to write since it is a first year university intro to calculus course, I take these tests at the University.

Also for the people that said that my Pre-Cal course doesn't cover all the stuff that the Ontario curriculum covers, what's missing? I am extremely curious.


There is an AP calc exam- 2 actually. Anyone can write it , even if you don't take an AP calc course

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/about_faq.html

Refer to "Can I take the AP Examination if I haven't taken an AP course?"



Applying to:

Queens University: Life Science (BSc)
University of Western Ontario: Biomed+ Scholar's electives (maybe) + AEO (BMSc +HBA)
University of Toronto, St George campus: Life Science (BSc), Trinity College or Victoria College
Mcgill University: Biol, Biomed, Life sci (Bsc)
UOIT: Life sci and management (no, please don't comment)
Harvard College
Yale University
Stanford University
Princeton University
Duke University
malaz
Posted: July 12, 2010 4:06:03 PM
Rank: Frosh
Groups: Member

Joined: 6/1/2010
Posts: 42
Toronto12 wrote:

Responding to your last question, the Pre-Cal course isn't the same as the cal in Ontario...I may be wrong...
But as I recall, these were in my cal book;
(I don't remember the exact name of each chapter but it had these)
-Limits (Discontinuity, differentiable, slopes of tangents and secants)
-Graphing functions with local max/min/discontinuity/ asymptotes etc
-Optimization
-Derivatives (Power rules, Quotient rules, implicit etc)
-Log, ln, exponent derivatives
-Vectors additions, subtraction
-Some vector optimization (Max speeds etc)
-Vectors with work, torque, force etc
-Cross and dot product
-Integrals (Depending on schools)
-I think Im missing some...

Anyways, if Pre-Cal does not cover these, then you should take the university course during the summer or something. Also, I had the same goal as you during my final year. I applied and got admitted to UTSG life science. For sure, they will look at your Calculus and English mark intensively, so focus on those and your science courses. Anything with 85% should get you in the life science program at UofT. As for other life science programs in other universities, you'll be fine with an 80% (cept Queens, Mcgills, Mac health sci). Well, best of luck to you!!

Here is the syllabus for Intro to Calculus:
1. Functions and Models
1.1 Four ways to Represent a Function
1.2 Mathematical Models: A Catalog of Essential Functions
1.3 New Functions from Old Functions
1.4 Graphing Calculators and Computers
1.5 Exponential Functions
1.6 Inverse Functions and Logarithms
2. Limits and Derivatives
2.1 The Tangent and Velocity Problems
2.2 The Limit of a Function
2.3 Calculating Limits Using the Limit Laws
2.4 [[The Precise Definition of a Limit]]
2.5 Continuity
2.6 Limits at Infinity; Horizontal Asymptotes
2.7 Derivatives and Rates of Change
2.8 The Derivative as a Function
3. Differentiation Rules
3.1 Derivatives of Polynomials and Exponential Functions
3.2 The Product and Quotient Rules
3.3 Derivatives of Trigonometric Functions
3.4 The Chain Rule
3.5 Implicit Differentiation
3.6 Derivatives of Logarithmic Functions
3.7 Rates of Change in the Natural [[and Social Sciences]]
3.8 Exponential Growth and Decay
3.9 Related Rates
3.10 Linear Approximations and Differentials
[[3.11 Hyperbolic Functions]]
4. Applications of Differentiation
4.1 Maximum and Minimum Values
4.2 The Mean Value Theorem
4.3 How Derivatives Affect the Shape of a Graph
4.4 Indeterminate Forms and L'Hopital's Rule
4.5 Summary of Curve Sketching
4.6 Graphing with Calculus and Calculators
4.7 Optimization Problems
4.8 [Newton's Method]
4.9 [[Antiderivatives]]

Is this equivalent to Calculus and Vectors?
Also don't you need at least a 90% to get into Life Sciences St. George (that's where I want to go)?? Or is it lower?
I also looked at U of T's first year Calculus course and it is awfully similar to this Intro to Calculus course I will be taking??
___

Quote:
There is an AP calc exam- 2 actually. Anyone can write it , even if you don't take an AP calc course

http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/about_faq.html

Refer to "Can I take the AP Examination if I haven't taken an AP course?"

I was talking about the Intro to Calculus course my school offers, since it is not an AP course there is no AP exam. Although thank you very much for informing me about the AP exam that I could take. It could serve as a second option if I can't take Calculus and Pre-Calculus at the same time.
Roberto
Posted: July 12, 2010 6:02:22 PM

Rank: Membre du conseil étudiant
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/7/2009
Posts: 451
Location: Ontario
Toronto12 wrote:
malaz wrote:
DeadLine wrote:
Your HS university course is actually not a real university course. It's called a university course because it's a prereq to real university courses. Essentially, the HS university-level course is a course you need to prepare you for next year's course(s) (at least it is what admissions look for, anyway).

If you can't enroll in yours, then what I would do is to first ask the admissions ppl whether they can give you an exception (explain your situation) when you apply next year. If they turn you down, then find other ways to get that credit (private school, online, etc).

Good luck!

It is actually a university course administered by the University of Manitoba--it is called MAT1500 and we are required to write the midterm and final ... and if you succeed you get 3 credit hours (whatever those are) ... since I am interested in U of T--I am just going for the high school credit. Which is completely fine by me.

Thank you ALL guys for the helpful comments--I figured out that I could possibly concurrently take Pre-calculus 40s and the Intro to Calculus/advanced math course ... this summer I will prepare for pre-cal--a family friend is a math teacher, and she is extremely smart (since she studied math in university) so she's going to help me and that would help me tackle both Pre-cal and Calculus at the same time come September.

And I definitely, IF I get accepted into u of t, don't want to go into physics and chemistry class and be like "I don't understand this" if I only had a pre-cal background. So I want to prepare as much as possible.

lemun wrote:
Actually it is not needed, it is recommended . In reality you could just write the AP Exam and not take the course (like I did) and they still wouldn't care. Although i chose UBC instead when I found out they aren't going to let people skip their 1st-year calculus

There is no AP Exam, there is a midterm and a final that we have to write since it is a first year university intro to calculus course, I take these tests at the University.

Also for the people that said that my Pre-Cal course doesn't cover all the stuff that the Ontario curriculum covers, what's missing? I am extremely curious.

Responding to your last question, the Pre-Cal course isn't the same as the cal in Ontario...I may be wrong...
But as I recall, these were in my cal book;
(I don't remember the exact name of each chapter but it had these)
-Limits (Discontinuity, differentiable, slopes of tangents and secants)
-Graphing functions with local max/min/discontinuity/ asymptotes etc
-Optimization
-Derivatives (Power rules, Quotient rules, implicit etc)
-Log, ln, exponent derivatives
-Vectors additions, subtraction
-Some vector optimization (Max speeds etc)
-Vectors with work, torque, force etc
-Cross and dot product
-Integrals (Depending on schools)
-I think Im missing some...

Anyways, if Pre-Cal does not cover these, then you should take the university course during the summer or something. Also, I had the same goal as you during my final year. I applied and got admitted to UTSG life science. For sure, they will look at your Calculus and English mark intensively, so focus on those and your science courses. Anything with 85% should get you in the life science program at UofT. As for other life science programs in other universities, you'll be fine with an 80% (cept Queens, Mcgills, Mac health sci). Well, best of luck to you!!






there's also vector equations, planes, intersection of lines, intersection of planes, gauss-jordan elimination, distance from a point to plane, distance from a point to a line, and projections

Applied to: Windsor Electrical Engineering, U of T Engineering Track One, and McMaster Engineering Physics
Attending: U of T Track One


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